Braden waters thesis

When Soviet authorities learned of the mutiny, the Kremlin ordered that control must be regained, fearing Sablin might follow in Jonas Pleškys's footsteps to ask political asylum in Sweden. Half the Baltic fleet , [3] including thirteen naval vessels, were sent in pursuit and were joined by 60 warplanes [3] (including three Yak-28 fighters), which dropped 500-pound bombs in the vicinity of the rebel ship. The aircraft also strafed Storozhevoy repeatedly. The ship's steering was damaged and she stopped dead on the water 43 miles from Swedish territorial waters and 330 miles from Kronstadt. After warning shots from the closing loyal warships, the frigate was eventually boarded by Soviet marine commandos . By then, Sablin had been shot and detained by members of his own crew, who also unlocked the captive captain and officers. [4] All the complement from Storozhevoy was arrested and interrogated, but only Sablin and his second-in-command, Alexander Shein, a 20-year-old seaman, were tried and convicted. At his trial in July 1976, Sablin was convicted of high treason and shot on 3 August 1976 , while Shein was sentenced to prison and was released after serving eight years. The rest of the mutineers were set free but dishonorably discharged from the Soviet Navy. [5]

Braden waters thesis

braden waters thesis

Media: