Sistren theatre collective thesis

Although Filewod is referring to the way that Canadian popular theatre was funded by the State, his argument can be extended to the way that development assistance and its concomitant funding of popular theatre groups from the global South was part of the “hegemonic workings of the liberal social contract.” The discourse of development in the Canadian context, what Barbara Heron argues is “one of the most significant narratives of the res publica, a kind of national calling that coalesces in both aid/development commitments and peacekeeping activities” (5), permeated political discourses and funding channels for social justice activities, thus shaping the Canadian popular theatre movement’s activities. Within Canada this alliance led to many joint projects between NGOs and popular theatre companies, such as Great Canadian Theatre Company’s productions of Sandinista! and Side Effects , as well as the funding of popular theatre festivals throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, which were hosted by the CPTA. In this period, popular theatre groups from the global South, such as the Philippine Educational Theatre Association (PETA) and Sistren performed their plays for general theatre audiences and ran workshops for popular theatre practitioners, development agency representatives, and community groups. In fact, workshop tours were one of the requirements of the funding provided; and Alan Filewod suggests that the Canadian popular theatre alliance heavily depended on it ( Committing Theatre 8).

Sistren theatre collective thesis

sistren theatre collective thesis

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