Thinking thinking

Emotion is often interpreted through visual cues on the face, body language and context. [20] However, context and cultural backgrounds have been shown to influence the visual perception and interpretation of emotion. [20] [21] Cross-cultural differences in change blindness have been associated with perceptual set, or a tendency to attend to visual scenes in a particular way. [22] For example, eastern cultures tend to emphasize background of an object, while western cultures focus on central objects in a scene. [22] Perceptual sets are also the result of cultural aesthetic preferences. Therefore, cultural context can influence how people sample information from a face, just like they would do in a situational context. For example, Caucasians generally fixate around eyes, nose and mouth, while Asians fixate on eyes. [21] Individuals from different cultural backgrounds who were shown a series of faces and asked to sort them into piles in which every face showed the same emotion. Fixation on different features of the face leads to disparate reading of emotions. [21] Asians' focus on the eyes lead to the perception of startled faces as surprise rather than fear. [21] As a result, previous associations or customs of an individual can lead to different categorization or recognition of emotion. This particular difference in visual perception of emotion seems to suggest an attention bias mechanism for wishful seeing, since certain visual cues were attended to (. nose, eyes) and the others were ignored (. mouth).

Thinking thinking

thinking thinking

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